The Carbon Tax – truth


A must see video which you will want to pass along quickly.

 

 

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About JustMEinT Musings

I like writing, reading and expressing my opinions. I prefer natural health and healing to pharmaceutical drugs. Jesus Christ is my Lord and Saviour.
This entry was posted in Anthropological Global Warming, Cap and Trade, Carbon Tax, Carbon Tax, CO2, GENERAL MUSINGS, Government Adverts, Indoctrination and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The Carbon Tax – truth

  1. Check out this link. This is something we really need to be concerned about.

    Privacy crackdown looms amid carbon crisis

    The beleaguered Gillard government will open a new reform front, pushing for a legal right to privacy in the wake of the News of the World scandal.

    Julia Gillard is in Ipswich, Queensland, this morning, where she’ll open the the Brassall State School Hall.

    Tony Abbott is in Melbourne where he’ll visit the Monash Medical Centre with Premier Ted Baillieu.

    Questions: It’s now fairly clear the Gillard government will use the British phone hacking crisis to crack down on Australia’s media. Privacy Minister Brendan O’Connor has flagged a new legislated right to privacy in the wake of the scandal. Expect this to be vigorously opposed by Australian media companies as an attack on press freedom. Crucially, there is absolutely no evidence here of the sort of journalistic malpractice exposed in Britain. Mr O’Connor did not nominate any previous local examples of the sort of conduct he wants to avoid.

    As she considers a Greens calls for a media inquiry, Julia Gillard yesterday declared that News Ltd had “hard questions to answer”, following the News of the World scandal. But she won’t say what they are. Are they secret questions? It’s all very unclear. News Ltd chairman and chief executive John Hartigan said the accusation was “unjustified and regrettable”.

    If the government is committed to the pursuit of answers to “hard questions”, perhaps it should look at reforms to the farce that is question time. ABC boss Mark Scott suggested a solution to the problem last night – adopting the British system of Prime Minister’s questions. It involves a ballot for questioners and backbenchers can ask supplementaries simply by leaping to their feet. “They just get through 20x as many questions as the House of Reps does in the same amount of time,” he tweeted. A twitter imitator of Speaker Harry Jenkins @HarryJ-Speaker gave short shrift to the suggestion. “I think not! ORDER!”

    Lookalike: Speaking of the British parliament, was that Steve Ciobo we saw in the House of Commons last night? He’s a dead ringer for UK Labour Leader Ed Miliband.

    Privacy crackdown looms amid carbon crisis

    * Ben Packham
    * From: The Australian
    * July 21, 2011 8:13AM

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    The beleaguered Gillard government will open a new reform front, pushing for a legal right to privacy in the wake of the News of the World scandal.

    Julia Gillard is in Ipswich, Queensland, this morning, where she’ll open the the Brassall State School Hall.

    Tony Abbott is in Melbourne where he’ll visit the Monash Medical Centre with Premier Ted Baillieu.

    Questions: It’s now fairly clear the Gillard government will use the British phone hacking crisis to crack down on Australia’s media. Privacy Minister Brendan O’Connor has flagged a new legislated right to privacy in the wake of the scandal. Expect this to be vigorously opposed by Australian media companies as an attack on press freedom. Crucially, there is absolutely no evidence here of the sort of journalistic malpractice exposed in Britain. Mr O’Connor did not nominate any previous local examples of the sort of conduct he wants to avoid.

    Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.
    Related Coverage

    * Public ‘expects’ review of privacy laws The Australian, 2 hours ago
    * Govt moves to strengthen privacy laws The Daily Telegraph, 3 hours ago
    * PM slur unjustifiable: News chief The Australian, 12 hours ago
    * ‘Hard questions’ for PM, Conroy and Brown The Australian, 12 hours ago
    * Between a rocky tax and media dead-end The Australian, 12 hours ago

    End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

    As she considers a Greens calls for a media inquiry, Julia Gillard yesterday declared that News Ltd had “hard questions to answer”, following the News of the World scandal. But she won’t say what they are. Are they secret questions? It’s all very unclear. News Ltd chairman and chief executive John Hartigan said the accusation was “unjustified and regrettable”.

    If the government is committed to the pursuit of answers to “hard questions”, perhaps it should look at reforms to the farce that is question time. ABC boss Mark Scott suggested a solution to the problem last night – adopting the British system of Prime Minister’s questions. It involves a ballot for questioners and backbenchers can ask supplementaries simply by leaping to their feet. “They just get through 20x as many questions as the House of Reps does in the same amount of time,” he tweeted. A twitter imitator of Speaker Harry Jenkins @HarryJ-Speaker gave short shrift to the suggestion. “I think not! ORDER!”

    Lookalike: Speaking of the British parliament, was that Steve Ciobo we saw in the House of Commons last night? He’s a dead ringer for UK Labour Leader Ed Miliband.

    Carbon ads: A coalition of business groups has begun their anti-carbon tax campaign with full page ads in major newspapers. The pitch “Carbon tax pain but no climate gain.” But they don’t seem to want anyone to learn more about the campaign. The group’s website is locked, showing the message “Forbidden: Access is denied”.

    http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/capital-circle/privacy-crackdown-looms/story-fn59nqgy-1226098776331

  2. Merilyn says:

    That is a very good video, and very easy to understand. [It works here].

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